Groundbreaking discovery meaning

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How does contact tracing app work? They discovered that an antibody which prevents the SARS virus from infecting human cells could also block the novel coronavirus from infecting human cells too, according a peer reviewed study published on Monday in the journal Nature Communications. File photo. Testing their collection of antibodies on cultured human cells, researchers discovered one which binds to a specific part which is present in both SARS and the virus causing COVID The discovery could offer an initial step towards developing a fully-human antibody to treat or prevent the disease, which has infected more then 3.

groundbreaking discovery meaning

The neutralising antibody "has potential to alter the course of infection in the infected host, support virus clearance or protect an uninfected individual that is exposed to the virus," said Dr Berend-Jan Bosch, co-lead author on the study. Dr Frank Grosveld, the study's other co-lead author, said the discovery provided "a strong foundation for additional research to characterise this antibody and begin development as a potential COVID treatment". The fully-human antibody is different from conventional therapeutic antibodies, which are often first developed in other species before being "humanised" so they can be transmitted to people.

It was developed using Harbour BioMed's H2L2 transgenic mouse technology - effectively a mouse which has been genetically engineered to contain human genes, enabling researchers to develop "human" antibodies without testing them on living people.

Police officers and troops are seen wearing face masks as they stand guard at a checkpoint in the outskirts of Metro Manila, Philippines, on March 15, as authorities began implementing a lockdown in Manila. A woman has her body temperature checked at an outpatient hospital in Moscow, Russia, on March A girl leans out of a window to applaud in Milan, Italy, on March 14, as a sign of solidarity in response to calls circulating on social media for people to ''gather'' on their balconies at certain hours, either to play music or to give each other a round of applause.

A health worker dressed in a protective suit prepares to disinfect the residence where Kenya's first confirmed coronavirus patient was staying, in the town of Rongai near Nairobi, Kenya, on March A pharmacist fixes a banner in Catalan, which reads "No masks, no alcohol, no clear hand gel" in a pharmacy in Barcelona, Spain, on March Prime Minister Abe said the coronavirus outbreak in his country has not reached a point that requires him to declare a national emergency like the U.

A sign indicates that the National Gallery of Art has been closed to the public due to the coronavirus threat in Washington D. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu delivers a speech at his Jerusalem office regarding the new measures that will be taken to fight the coronavirus, on March The match was played behind closed doors. President Donald Trump speaks about the U.

He said that travel to the nation from over two dozen European countries has been suspended for the next 30 days. The ban applies to foreign nationals; American citizens who are screened before entering would not face any issues.

Trees are decorated with ribbons in support of coronavirus patients at the Life Care Center of Kirkland in Washington, U. Chinese President Xi Jinping learns about the hospital's operations, treatment of patients, protection for medical workers and scientific research at the Huoshenshan Hospital in Wuhan, China, on March Race goers use hand sanitiser installed at Cheltenham Racecourse in Cheltenham, England, on March A woman wearing a protective face mask walks on an almost empty street in Yokohama, Japan, on March Workers at a building, where at least 46 people were confirmed to have COVID, wait in line for coronavirus testing at a temporary facility in Seoul, South Korea, on March Passengers of the cruise ship Grand Princess look from the balconies of their cabins as tests for COVID are conducted and arrangements are made to offload passengers while the vessel docks at the Port of Oakland, California, U.

President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus outbreak, in the briefing room of the White House in Washington, D.February 24, Stephen Chester, an assistant professor of anthropology and paleontologist at the Graduate Center, CUNY and Brooklyn College, was part of a team of 10 researchers from across the United States who analyzed several fossils of Purgatorius, the oldest genus in a group of the earliest-known primates called plesiadapiforms.

These ancient mammals were small-bodied and ate specialized diets of insects and fruits that varied across species. This discovery is central to primate ancestry and adds to our understanding of how life on land recovered after the Cretaceous—Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago that wiped out all dinosaurs, except for birds.

This study was documented in a paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science. Chester and Gregory Wilson Mantilla, Burke Museum Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology and University of Washington biology professor, were co-leads on this study, where the team analyzed fossilized teeth found in the Hell Creek area of northeastern Montana. The fossils, now part of the collections at the University of California Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley, are estimated to be Based on the age of the fossils, the team estimates that the ancestor of all primates the group including plesiadapiforms and today's primates such as lemurs, monkeys, and apes likely emerged by the Late Cretaceous—and lived alongside large dinosaurs.

This is not the first big find Chester has been involved with. While this latest discovery is unique in that it focused on one group of mammals—primates—inChester, along with current collaborator Wilson Mantilla, was a key member of a groundbreaking discovery that revealed in striking detail how many life forms—including mammals, turtles, crocodiles, and plants—recovered after the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. Inwhile at Brooklyn College, Chester was also the lead author on a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on this same genus of primate, Purgatorius.

His co-authored paper described the ankle bones of Purgatorius, which is still the oldest fossil evidence that primates lived in the trees shortly after the extinction of the dinosaurs. Explore further. More from Biology and Medical. Your feedback will go directly to Science X editors. Thank you for taking your time to send in your valued opinion to Science X editors. You can be assured our editors closely monitor every feedback sent and will take appropriate actions.

Your opinions are important to us. We do not guarantee individual replies due to extremely high volume of correspondence. E-mail the story New fossil discovery illuminates the lives of the earliest primates Your friend's email Your email I would like to subscribe to Science X Newsletter.

Learn more Your name Note Your email address is used only to let the recipient know who sent the email. Neither your address nor the recipient's address will be used for any other purpose.In the series that inspired a generation of food fans, Alton explores the origins of ingredients, decodes culinary customs and presents food and equipment trends. Punctuated by unusual interludes, simple preparations and unconventional discussions, each episode features food in its finest and funniest form.

The remaining episodes will roll out every Thursday for the next five weeks. In the premiere episodes, Alton tackles bone marrow and delivers everything you need to know to enjoy "God's butter" at home; opens all-new dimensions of coffee enjoyment with an exploration of cold brew - and no, iced coffee isn't the same thing; and takes on two very different fried breads, each with a twist.

Upcoming topics include immersion cooking, Bibimbap, dried seaweeds, the science and technique of making "real" bagels at home and lactic acid bacteria, which can make fruits and vegetables longer lasting with great taste. Good Eats, written, produced and hosted by Alton Brown, originally premiered on Food Network in and ran for thirteen years.

Combining food science, pop culture, skit humor, innovative cooking, and the occasional belching puppet, Good Eats has millions of fans and garnered a coveted Peabody Award for broadcast excellence in Follow GoodEatsTheReturn on social to get exclusive videos of Alton on-set as he explains the whats, whys and hows of your favorite ingredients.

Plus, use GoodEatsTheReturn to join the conversation anytime and to share photos of Alton's recipes that you're cooking at home. Fans wanting more can also visit DiscoveryPlus. For more, visit discoveryplus.For the first time ever, astronomers at The University of New Mexico say they've been able to observe and measure the orbital motion between two supermassive black holes hundreds of millions of light years from Earth - a discovery more than a decade in the making.

Naval Observatory and the Gemini Observatory, have been studying the interaction between these black holes for 12 years.

groundbreaking discovery meaning

In earlyan international team of researchers, including a UNM alumnus, working on the LIGO project detected the existence of gravitational waves, confirming Albert Einstein's year-old prediction and astonishing the scientific community. Now, thanks to this latest research, scientists will be able to start to understand what leads up to the merger of supermassive black holes that creates ripples in the fabric of space-time and begin to learn more about the evolution of galaxies and the role these black holes play in it.

Over time, astronomers have essentially been able to plot their trajectory and confirm them as a visual binary system. In other words, they've observed these black holes in orbit with one another.

Taylor gave me this data I was at the very beginning of learning how to image and understand it," said Bansal. It's very exciting. For Taylor, the discovery is the result of more than 20 years of work and an incredible feat given the precision required to pull off these measurements.

Bansal says these supermassive black holes have a combined mass of 15 billion times that of our sun, or 15 billion solar masses.

groundbreaking discovery meaning

The unbelievable size of these black holes means their orbital period is around 24, years, so while the team has been observing them for over a decade, they've yet to see even the slightest curvature in their orbit. Romani, professor of physics at Stanford University and member of the research team. While the technical accomplishment of this discovery is truly amazing, Bansal and Taylor say the research could also teach us a lot about the universe, where galaxies come from and where they're going.

Naval Observatory. Continuing to observe the orbit and interaction of these two supermassive black holes could also help us gain a better understanding of what the future of our own galaxy might look like. Right now, the Andromeda galaxy, which also has a SMBH at its center, is on a path to collide with our Milky Way, meaning the event Bansal and Taylor are currently observing, might occur in our galaxy in a few billion years.

Bansal says the research team will take another observation of this system in three or four years to confirm the motion and obtain a precise orbit. In the meantime, the team hopes that this discovery will encourage related work from astronomers around the world. Skip to main content.Try to imagine life without antibiotics. We wouldn? Inwhile on his deathbed, Polish astronomer Nicholas Copernicus published his theory that the Sun is a motionless body at the center of the solar system, with the planets revolving around it.

Before the Copernicum system was introduced, astronomers believed the Earth was at the center of the universe. Isaac Newton, an English mathematician and physicist, is considered the greatest scientist of all time. Among his many discoveries, the most important is probably his law of universal gravitation. InNewton figured out that gravity is the force that draws objects toward each other. It explained why things fall down and why the planets orbit around the Sun.

If electricity makes life easier for us, you can thank Michael Faraday. He made two big discoveries that changed our lives. Inhe discovered that when a wire carrying an electric current is placed next to a single magnetic pole, the wire will rotate. This led to the development of the electric motor. Ten years later, he became the first person to produce an electric current by moving a wire through a magnetic field. Faraday's experiment created the first generator, the forerunner of the huge generators that produce our electricity.

When Charles Darwin, the British naturalist, came up with the theory of evolution inhe changed our idea of how life on earth developed. Darwin argued that all organisms evolve, or change, very slowly over time. These changes are adaptations that allow a species to survive in its environment. These adaptations happen by chance. If a species doesn't adapt, it may become extinct. He called this process natural selectionbut it is often called the survival of the fittest.

Before French chemist Louis Pasteur began experimenting with bacteria in the s, people did not know what caused disease. He not only discovered that disease came from microorganisms, but he also realized that bacteria could be killed by heat and disinfectant. This idea caused doctors to wash their hands and sterilize their instruments, which has saved millions of lives. Albert Einstein? The complicated theory states that the speed of light always remains the same?

This theory became the foundation for much of modern science.

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Nobody knows exactly how the universe came into existence, but many scientists believe that it happened about InGeorges Lematre proposed the Big Bang theory of the universe.

The theory says that all the matter in the universe was originally compressed into a tiny dot.Night after night Eugene Aserinsky had been working late. He had tinkered with it long enough to think it might not be totally unreliable. From the adjacent room, Aserinsky calibrated the machine, telling Armond to look left, right, up and down.

And then it was lights out, the sharp smell of acetone lingering in the darkness. Armond fell asleep; his father tried not to. Sustained by pretzels and coffee, Aserinsky sat at a desk under the hellish red eyes of a gargoyle-shaped lamp.

He was 30 years old, a trim, handsome man of medium height, with black hair, a mustache, blue eyes and the mien of a bullfighter. When he was not in his lab coat, he usually wore a bow tie and a dark suit. He was a graduate student in physiology, and his future was riding on this research. He had nothing but a high school degree to fall back on. His wife, Sylvia, was pregnant with their second child.

They lived on campus in a converted Army barracks heated by a kerosene stove. The hours crept by in the spooky gray-stone gloom of Abbott Hall. Aserinsky went in to check on his son, expecting to find him wide awake.

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What was going on? Yet another problem with the infernal machine? The existence of rapid eye movement REM and its correlation with dreaming was announced 50 years ago last month in a brief, little-noted report in the journal Science. The two-page paper is a fine example of the maxim that the eye can see only what the mind knows: for thousands of years the physical clues of REM sleep were baldly visible to anyone who ever gazed at the eyelids of a napping child or studied the twitching paws of a sleeping dog.

The association of a certain stage of sleep with dreaming might have been described by any number of observant cave men; in fact, if the 17,year-old Lascaux cave painting of a presumably dreaming Cro-Magnon hunter with an erect penis is any indication, maybe it was. But scientists had long been blinkered by preconceptions about the sleeping brain. It remains an astonishing anachronism in the history of science that Watson and Crick unraveled the structure of DNA before virtually anything was known about the physiological condition in which people spend one-third of their lives.

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His now-classic paper, coauthored by advisor Kleitman, was less important for what it revealed than what it began. REM opened the terra incognita of the sleeping brain to scientific exploration.

groundbreaking discovery meaning

Before REM, it was assumed that sleep was a passive state; absent stimulation, the brain simply switched off at night like a desk lamp. The mind in REM sleep teems with vivid dreams; some brain structures consume oxygen and glucose at rates equal to or higher than in waking. The surprising implication is that the brain, which generates and evidently benefits from sleep, seems to be too busy to get any sleep itself.

The discovery of REM launched a new branch of medicine, leading to the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders that afflict tens of millions of people.

Groundbreaking discovery of supermassive black holes

It also changed the way we view our dreams and ourselves. Many researchers continue to hope that REM may yet provide a link between the physical activity of the brain during a dream and the experience of dreaming itself. The cot where research subjects slept was pitched under a metal hood formerly used to suck out noxious lab fumes. At the time, few scientists were interested in the subject. Sleep was what happened when you turned out the lights and stopped the influx of sensation. Sleep was what the brain lapsed into, not what it actively constructed.

On the face of it, dull stuff. A painstaking researcher, he once stayed up hours straight to appraise the effects of sleep deprivation on himself.By Mark Prigg For Dailymail. Researchers say the discovery, which took 12 years to confirm, will allow them to start to understand what leads up to the merger of supermassive black holes that creates ripples in the fabric of space-time.

The Andromeda galaxy, which also has a SMBH at its center, is on a path to collide with our Milky Way, meaning the event the researchers are currently observing might occur in our galaxy in a few billion years. She, along with and colleagues at Stanford, the U. Naval Observatory and the Gemini Observatory, have been studying the interaction between these black holes for 12 years. Bansal says these supermassive black holes have a combined mass of 15 billion times that of our sun, or 15 billion solar masses.

The unbelievable size of these black holes means their orbital period is around 24, years, so while the team has been observing them for over a decade, they've yet to see even the slightest curvature in their orbit. Romani, professor of physics at Stanford University and member of the research team. In earlyan international team of researchers, including a UNM alumnus, working on the LIGO project detected the existence of gravitational waves, confirming Albert Einstein's year-old prediction and astonishing the scientific community.

Now, thanks to this latest research, scientists will be able to start to understand what leads up to the merger of supermassive black holes that creates ripples in the fabric of space-time and begin to learn more about the evolution of galaxies and the role these black holes play in it.

Taylor gave me this data I was at the very beginning of learning how to image and understand it,' said Bansal. And, as I learned there was data going back towe plotted it and determined they are orbiting one another.

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It's very exciting. For Taylor, the discovery is the result of more than 20 years of work and an incredible feat given the precision required to pull off these measurements.

Over time, astronomers have essentially been able to plot their trajectory and confirm them as a visual binary system. In other words, they've observed these black holes in orbit with one another. While the technical accomplishment of this discovery is truly amazing, Bansal and Taylor say the research could also teach us a lot about the universe, where galaxies come from and where they're going. Naval Observatory. Continuing to observe the orbit and interaction of these two supermassive black holes could also help us gain a better understanding of what the future of our own galaxy might look like.

Right now, the Andromeda galaxy, which also has a SMBH at its center, is on a path to collide with our Milky Way, meaning the event Bansal and Taylor are currently observing, might occur in our galaxy in a few billion years.

Bansal says the research team will take another observation of this system in three or four years to confirm the motion and obtain a precise orbit. In the meantime, the team hopes that this discovery will encourage related work from astronomers around the world. Latest Headlines U. Argos AO.

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